Experience a class

Attention grade 10, 11 and 12 students!  Are you thinking about university?  Come experience a class and see what it's all about!

For one week in March, there are 18 interesting classes available, 3 presentations (one from Liaison, one from the Center of Academic Excellence, and one from the Indigenous Learning Strategist), as well as campus tours for you to attend.

Lunch will be provided to students who attend a minimum of one class, as well as attend a campus tour or a presentation by Liaison, the Center for Academic Excellence, or the Indigenous Learning Strategist.

We believe that this opportunity will not only spark your interest and aid in guiding your future, but also help alleviate some of the fears that may be associated with moving on to post-secondary education.

Available courses for March 2017:
Courses Date and time
Média électroniques et internet (ETJO 2187) : Introduction aux techniques de recherche, d'écriture et de production pour la radio, la télévision, le film et Internet. Rôle du visuel et du verbal dans la communication. Expérimentation avec différents genres et formats. lundi 13 mars
13 h 00 à 14 h 20

jeudi 16 mars
13 h 00 à 14 h 20

Communication interculturelle (ETJO 3106): Analyse des problèmes particuliers du contexte interculturel. Comment pondérer la valeur des expressions de perspectives de regroupements d'intérêts divers. Comment les différences culturelles affectent-elles la gestion des organisations ? Comment affectent-elles les relations internationales ? Comment maintenir des rapports harmonieux entre les différentes communautés en contexte multiculturel ?

lundi 13 mars
10 h 00 à 11 h 20

jeudi 16 mars
10 h 00 à 11 h 20

Introductory Nishnaabemwin B (INDG 1017): This course builds on the skills acquired in INDG 1016, and introduces students to concepts essential for expressing thoughts that involve objects, not simply subjects. Third person objects will be the focus of the course. Students will be able to communicate about a wide variety of topics.

Monday, March 13
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 16
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

North American Native People: Tradition and Culture (INDG/RLST 2285): A discussion of basic Native spiritual insights and the traditions and cultural expressions developing therefrom. The contemporary revival of these and their relevance to the present day is emphasized.

Wednesday, March 15
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Indigenous Arts of the Americas: Retrospective and Transition (INDG 2505): Traces Native artistic expression and development from traditional times to the 20th century. Emphasizes architecture, literature and the visual and performing arts. These art forms are examined as traditional cultural expressions manifesting in the spiritual beliefs, legends and myths, symbolism and the practical application of daily life. As well, contemporary expressions are examined as evolving out of traditional forms and as reflections of modern concerns and influences.

Tuesday, March 14
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Canadian Law, Politics and Aboriginal People (INDG/POLI 3105): Explores the political, legal and constitutional status of Aboriginal people in Canada. It includes an examination of the effects of laws and policies on their individual and collective rights. The Constitution Act, Indian Act, international law and Aboriginal customary law are studied. Issues such as self-government, self-determination, Treaty rights and Aboriginal rights are discussed.

Tuesday, March 14
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Friday, March 17
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Native Critical Theory (INDG 3226): This course explores the subject area that is becoming known as Native Critical Theory. The course draws mostly from Western and Indigenous knowledge and is based primarily on readings. Emphasis is also placed on the monthly Native Studies teaching sessions and the discussion of ideas with the Elders. Native Critical Theory is then applied to a particular site of analysis.

Tuesday, March 14
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 16
2:30 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Introduction à la philosophie (PHIL 1105): Ce cours initie les étudiantes et les étudiants à la philosophie en les aidants à poser les grandes questions qui orientent nos vies. Ces questions sont notamment : Quel est le sens de ma vie? Qu'est-ce que la vérité? Que dois-je faire? Qu'est-ce que la beauté? Qui suis-je? Les étudiantes et les étudiants approfondiront le sens de ces questions en se confrontant aux textes de philosophes importants d'hier et d'aujourd'hui.

lundi 13 mars
11 h 30 à 12 h 50

jeudi 16 mars
11 h 30 à 12 h 50

Philosophy of Sexuality (PHIL 2126):  The students are directed to a variety of philosophical perspectives to examine critically such issues as: love, desire, sexual orientation, perversion, rape, prostitution, loyalty, friendship, instincts, repression, and privacy.

Tuesday, March 14
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Philosophy, Culture and Power (PHIL 2156): This course examines philosophical issues in contemporary discourses on cultural difference and power. Themes and questions that may be explored include race, ethnicity, indigenous and native rights, equality, identity, language, cosmopolitanism, nationhood, colonialism, disability, human and minority rights, and diaspora.

Monday, March 13
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Wednesday, March 15
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Bioethics: Human Life Issues (PHIL/RLST 2345): Examines current controversies about the benefits and dangers to human life arising from recent developments in the biomedical sciences. Special attention is given to issues in the reproductive technologies, genetics, the care of the terminally ill, AIDS, research with human subjects, and to questions of abortion and euthanasia. Comprehensive understanding of the issues at stake and ability to evaluate the positions taken in these controversies define the aims of the course.

Tuesday, March 14
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 16
2:30 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Critical Thinking and Argumentation (PHIL 2505): The central goal of this course is to help students develop interpretive and evaluative skills, and dispositions that will be useful to them in their courses and in their personal lives. Various aspects of language and logic are studied to evaluate correctly arguments and explanations from a variety of disciplines and contexts.

Monday, March 13
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 16
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Business Ethics (PHIL 2876): Explores ethical issues which arise in the management of a modern corporation, such as the goals and functions of the firm, corporate social responsibility, conflicts between personnel, organizational and societal values, international and environmental issues, and the firm's duties to workers, consumers and other stakeholders.

Tuesday, March  14
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Friday, March 17
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Kant (PHIL 3407): This course introduces the student to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant through a study of selections from key texts, including Critique of Pure Reason. The major principles of Kant’s practical and aesthetic philosophy may also be examined. Kant’s philosophy will be situated in its historical context.

Monday, March 13
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Thursday, March 16
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Moral Philosophy (PHIL 3545): A study of major themes and theories in moral philosophy. Themes include: freedom and responsibility, the relation of morality and religion, the enforcement of morals, moral education, coercion, self-interest and pleasure. Theories may include those of Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Mill, Kant and a number of 20th-century theories amongst others.

Monday, March 13
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 15
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Magic, Witchcraft, and Divination in the Ancient Near East (RLST 3131): This course examines the many forms of magic accepted and practiced in the ancient Near East. Through study of original sources dating from the earliest Mesopotamian civilizations until Alexander the Great, this course identifies these practices and the beliefs they involved in their various social, cultural, religious, and political settings. Topics covered include witchcraft, divination, blessings and curses, incantations, medicinal practices and exorcism. Although focused on the pre-Classical Near East, limited attention is given to the evolution of these traditions in later periods.

Tuesday, March 14
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Friday, March 17
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

La religion et ses sources (SREL 1005): Une étude de certaines expériences dans les grandes traditions religieuses orientales et occidentales, incluant celles des Amérindiens et des Amérindiennes, pour découvrir les interprétations de l'être humain et de son environnement qui en découlent. L'étude comporte une analyse des modèles universels présents dans l'expérience religieuse: elle montre comment le sacré donne un sens à la vie de l'être humain dans toute sa diversité, produit une réponse exprimée dans son culte, ses symboles et sa morale, et permet de faire face aux situations nouvelles d'un monde en changement.

 lundi 13 mars
10 h 00 à 11 h 20

jeudi 16 mars
10 h 00 à 11 h 20

Panorama de la pensée islamique (SREL 2257): Ce cours est une introduction à la pensée islamique en ses deux disciplines intellectuelles majeures, la philosophie (falsafa) et la théologie (kalam), qui ont produit une vaste littérature sur des thèmes variées, en rapport avec le Coran. Le cours couvrira plusieurs grands penseurs musulmans comme al-kindî, al-Fârâbi, al-Ghazzâlî, Ibn Rushd et Ibn al-'Arabi.

 lundi 13 mars
19 h 00 à 22 h 00


Campus tours are offered:
Monday, March 13 9:00 a.m.
Tuesday, March 14 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 15 1:00 p.m.
Thursday, March 16 11:30 a.m.
Friday, March 17 1:00 p.m.

Important information to be presented: 
Presentation by Liaison: This presentation will cover topics relating to program options, how to apply, financial aid, etc. 

Tuesday, March 14
9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Presentation by the Center of Academic Excellence: This presentation will cover topics such as time management, how to give a presentation, how to write a dissertation, as well as other essential tips for students. 

Thursday, March 16
9:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Presentation by Indigenous Learning Strategist: This presentation will cover services offered to First Nations, Métis and Inuit students. 

Monday, March 13
3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.


The deadline to register is Friday, March 3, 2017 .  Spots will be filled on a first come first registered basis.  There is no fee for attending; however, students are responsible for making arrangement for their transportation .

For more information please contact Sarah Noel by email se_noel@usudbury.ca or by calling 705-673-5661, ext. 307.

REGISTER NOW
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