Experience a class

Are you thinking about university?  Come experience a class and see what it's all about!

For one week in March, there are 17 interesting classes available, 3 presentations (one from Liaison, one from the Center of Academic Excellence, and one from the Indigenous Learning Strategist), as well as campus tours for you to attend.

Lunch will be provided to students who attend a minimum of one class, as well as attend a campus tour or a presentation by Liaison, the Center for Academic Excellence, or the Indigenous Learning Strategist.

We believe that this opportunity will not only spark your interest and aid in guiding your future, but also help alleviate some of the fears that may be associated with moving on to post-secondary education.

Furthermore, this activity is considered to be a “reach a head experience” for high school students who are pursuing a Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM). A certificate of completion will be given SHSM students upon request.

Available courses for March 2018:
Courses Date and time
Initiation au journalisme et aux relations publiques (ETJO 1127): Introduction à la pratique quotidienne du communicateur ou de la communicatrice. Familiarisation avec les milieux de travail du journaliste et du relationniste. Premiers exercices pratiques. Exploration des débouchés. lundi 12 mars
13 h 00 à 14 h 20

jeudi 15 mars
13 h 00 à 14 h 20

Analyse sémiotique des médias (ETJO 2156): Analyse des médias en tant que signes. Définition du signe, du sens, de la signification. Concepts de dénotation et de connotation. Analyse des composantes audiovisuelles des médias (image, son, raccords, champ et hors champ, etc.) et de leurs dimensions symboliques.

lundi 12 mars
14 h 30 à 15 h 50

mercredi 14 mars
14 h 30 à 15 h 50
Implications of Aboriginal Peoplehood (INDG 1117): This course explains the implications that distinct Aboriginal identities have for relations between Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal society and governments, as well as among the diverse Aboriginal groups such as status Indians, Metis and various tribes.

Tuesday, March 13
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 15
2:30 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Intermediate Nishnaabemwin A (INDG 2516): This course is distinguished by its two principal areas of focus: communicating one's own actions and activities, typically in response to questions from a second person; and questions that begin with what, when, where, how and why. The students will learn how to compose questions and answers that have subjects only, no objects.

Tuesday, March 13
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Canadian Law, Politics and Aboriginal People (INDG/POLI 3105): Explores the political, legal and constitutional status of Aboriginal people in Canada. It includes an examination of the effects of laws and policies on their individual and collective rights. The Constitution Act, Indian Act, international law and Aboriginal customary law are studied. Issues such as self-government, self-determination, Treaty rights and Aboriginal rights are discussed.

Tuesday, March 13
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Friday, March 16
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Aboriginal People and the Criminal Justice System (INDG3116): Examines the involvement of the Aboriginal people in the Criminal Justice System. Identifies the problems encountered in the system and studies the proposals for reform. Among those developments specifically examined are the following: the Native Courtworker Programs, the Native Justice of the Peace Programs, the Native Inmate Liaison Service Programs and the alternatives to incarceration programs.

Tuesday, March 13
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Friday, March 16
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Native Critical Theory (INDG 3226): This course explores the subject area that is becoming known as Native Critical Theory. The course draws mostly from Western and Indigenous knowledge and is based primarily on readings. Emphasis is also placed on the monthly Native Studies teaching sessions and the discussion of ideas with the Elders. Native Critical Theory is then applied to a particular site of analysis.

Wednesday, March 14
11:30 a.m. to 12 :50 p.m.

Friday, March 16
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Introduction à la philosophie (PHIL 1105): Ce cours initie les étudiantes et les étudiants à la philosophie en les aidant à poser les grandes questions qui orientent nos vies. Ces questions sont notamment : Quel est le sens de ma vie? Qu'est-ce que la vérité? Que dois-je faire? Qu'est-ce que la beauté? Qui suis-je? Les étudiantes et les étudiants approfondiront le sens de ces questions en se confrontant aux textes de philosophes importants d'hier et d'aujourd'hui.

lundi 12 mars
10 h 00 à 11 h 20

jeudi 15 mars
10 h 00 à 11 h 20

Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 1115): Provides an introduction to philosophy by helping students formulate ultimate questions whose answers guide our lives, such as: What is the meaning of life? What is truth? How should I behave? What is beauty? Who am I? Students have the opportunity to think reflectively about such questions by exploring and evaluating critically the writings of influential philosophers of the past and of our own day.

Monday, March 12
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Tuesday, March 13
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 15
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Thursday, March 15
2:30 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Philosophy of Sexuality (PHIL 2126): The students are directed to a variety of philosophical perspectives to examine critically such issues as: love, desire, sexual orientation, perversion, rape, prostitution, loyalty, friendship, instincts, repression, and privacy.

Tuesday, March 13
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Origins of Western Philosophy (PHIL 2305): The philosophers of ancient Greece developed many of the themes that have dominated ethical, political, metaphysical, and psychological debates down to modern times. The course examines these and other major trends in Greek thought, with special emphasis on the work of Plato and Aristotle, in order to consider them as philosophical arguments in their own right, and to address the legacy of Greek thought in shaping contemporary culture.

Monday, March 12
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Thursday, March 15
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Bioethics: Human Life Issues (PHIL/RLST 2345): Examines current controversies about the benefits and dangers to human life arising from recent developments in the biomedical sciences. Special attention is given to issues in the reproductive technologies, genetics, the care of the terminally ill, AIDS, research with human subjects, and to questions of abortion and euthanasia. Comprehensive understanding of the issues at stake and ability to evaluate the positions taken in these controversies define the aims of the course.

Tuesday, March 13
4:00 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 15
4:00 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.

Social and Political Philosophy (PHIL 2816): This course examines how societies are shaped by different ideals and values (e.g., heroism, authority, tradition, fairness, freedom, equality, independence, forgiveness, tolerance) and how these are embodied in social and politicalinstitutions over time. The conceptual ramifications of the promotion of such ideals in media, culture, and everyday life may also be explored.

Tuesday, March 13
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Thursday, March 15
2:30 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

Business Ethics (PHIL 2876): Explores ethical issues which arise in the management of a modern corporation, such as the goals and functions of the firm, corporate social responsibility, conflicts between personnel, organizational and societal values, international and environmental issues, and the firm's duties to workers, consumers and other stakeholders.

Tuesday, March 12
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Friday, March 16
11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Marx, Marxism and Socialism (PHIL 3486): A study of the foundations of Karl Marx's wide ranging critique of modern society, stressing its philosophical roots and implications, both in substance and in method, and the subsequent diversity of interpretations in socialism from the 19th century to the present day, with special emphasis on Canadian socialist theory and theory of the labour movement.

Monday, March 12
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Wednesday, March 14
4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Philosophy and Psychology (RLST 3876): Examines some main philosophical problems concerned with everyday explanations of human behaviour, and explanations found within experimental and clinical psychology. How do methods of verification, types of concepts, prediction, etc., differ from one case to the other? What bearing do questions in philosophy of mind have on explanations in psychology of human behaviour? A representative variety of psychological theories and techniques are discussed.

Tuesday, March 12
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Friday, March 16
10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

La personne de Jésus II (SREL 2187): Ce cours continue l'étude de la personne de Jésus à travers les témoignages du Nouveau Testament. En tenant compte des interprétations les plus récentes, on examine les perceptions de la figure de Jésus dans les genres littéraires divers.

mardi 13 mars
13 h 00 à 14 h 20

jeudi 15 mars
14 h 30 à 15 h 50


Campus tours are offered:
Monday, March 12 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday, March 13 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 14 10:00 a.m.
Thursday, March 15 9:00 a.m.
Friday, March 16 2:30 p.m.

Important information to be presented: 
Presentation by Liaison: This presentation will cover topics relating to program options, how to apply, financial aid, etc. 

Monday, March 12
9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Presentation by the Center of Academic Excellence: This presentation will cover topics such as time management, how to give a presentation, how to write a dissertation, as well as other essential tips for students. 

Tuesday, March 13
9:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Presentation by Indigenous Learning Strategist: This presentation will cover services offered to First Nations, Métis and Inuit students. 

Tuesday, March 13
3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.


The deadline to register is Friday, March 2, 2018 .  Spots will be filled on a first come first registered basis.  There is no fee for attending; however, students are responsible for making arrangement for their transportation .

For more information please contact Sarah Noel by email se_noel@usudbury.ca or by calling 705-673-5661, ext. 307.

REGISTER NOW
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